Download the Skolay app
Skolay / 1:1 Audio Conversations / 
Paul Fischer
Paul Fischer
Author of A Kim Jong-Il Production and The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures
Film
History
Biography
True Crime
Where else you can find me
Personal website
Substack
Book a 1:1 with Paul
Hi!

one two three four five six seven eight nine ten eleven twelve thirteen fourteen fifteen sixteen seventeen eighteen nineteen twenty, twenty-one twenty-two twenty-three twenty-four twenty-five twenty-six twenty-seven twenty-eight twenty-nine thirty, thirty-one thirty-two thirty-three thirty-four thirty-five thirty-six thirty-seven thirty-eight thirty-nine forty,

forty-one forty-two forty-three forty-four forty-five forty-six forty-seven forty-eight forty-nine fifty, fifty-one fifty-two fifty-three fifty-four fifty-five fifty-six fifty-seven fifty-eight fifty-nine sixty, sixty-one sixty-two sixty-three sixty-four sixty-five sixty-six sixty-seven sixty-eight sixty-nine seventy, seventy-one seventy-two seventy-three seventy-four seventy-five seventy-six seventy-seven seventy-eight seventy-nine eighty,

eighty-one eighty-two eighty-three eighty-four eighty-five eighty-six eighty-seven eighty-eight eighty-nine ninety, ninety-one ninety-two ninety-three ninety-four ninety-five ninety-six ninety-seven ninety-eight ninety-nine one hundred

Talk soon,
Sam

Hello!

On my mind

I'm always thinking about movies, about writing, about books and every kind of creative process. But it sometimes feels like everything is on my mind, all the time -- I'll talk about anything. Current rabbit holes I'm lost in: 1970s cinema, the myth of male genius, the possibility and implications of brain transplants, faiths and cults, and Charles Schulz's Peanuts. Always Charles Schulz's Peanuts.

Why I'm excited to talk with readers

There's no cooler feeling than seeing something you thought you knew well in a different light or from a different point of view, which is what always happens when speaking to readers. It's one of my favourite things.

Talk soon,

Paul

Let's talk! Open to...👇
Freewheeling conversations
Questions about my writing
Questions about your writing
Writing in general
Getting to know you
Surprise me!
 Upcoming
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...Book a 1:1 with PaulBook a 1:1 with Paul
🔔 Don't see a time that works?
Notify me when this writer has new availability.
Thank you! You'll be the first to know when this writer has new availability! 
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
📚 Bring me to your Book Club!
I love talking with book clubs, and would be delighted to meet with yours! Once you submit your request, Skolay will reach back out to you to confirm the details.
Cancel RequestStart Request
Book Club Request 
$100 / Session
Specify a date & time
Propose up to 3 options
:
Add option
Option 2
:
Remove
Remove
Add option
Option 3
Option 2
:
Remove
Remove
Add option
Enter contact info
Send a note
Please share any details about your group that would be helpful: e.g., what you're reading, how many members, etc.
Thank you! Your submission has been received. We'll get back to you as soon as possible.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
My latest
My Substack
 by 
Paul Fischer
Where I've written

The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures

A True Tale of Obsession, Murder, and the Movies

The year is 1888, and Louis Le Prince is finally testing his “taker” or “receiver” device for his family on the front lawn. The device is meant to capture ten to twelve images per second on film, creating a reproduction of reality that can be replayed as many times as desired. In an otherwise separate and detached world, occurrences from one end of the globe could now be viewable with only a few days delay on the other side of the world. No human experience—from the most mundane to the most momentous—would need to be lost to history.

In 1890, Le Prince was granted patents in four countries ahead of other inventors who were rushing to accomplish the same task. But just weeks before unveiling his invention to the world, he mysteriously disappeared and was never seen or heard from again. Three and half years later, Thomas Edison, Le Prince’s rival, made the device public, claiming to have invented it himself. And the man who had dedicated his life to preserving memories was himself lost to history—until now.

The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures pulls back the curtain and presents a “passionate, detailed defense of Louis Le Prince…unfurled with all the cliffhangers and red herrings of a scripted melodrama” (The New York Times Book Review). This “fascinating, informative, skillfully articulated narrative” (Kirkus Reviews, starred review) presents the never-before-told history of the motion picture and sheds light on the unsolved mystery of Le Prince’s disappearance.

“A passionate, detailed defence of Louis Le Prince… unfurled with all the cliffhangers and red herrings of a scripted melodrama”

The New York Times Book Review

See more
See less

A Kim Jong-Il Production

Before becoming the world's most notorious dictator, Kim Jong-Il ran North Korea's film industry. He directed every film made in the country but knew they were nothing compared to Hollywood. Then he hit on the perfect solution: order the kidnapping of South Korea's most famous actress and her ex-husband, the country's most acclaimed director.

In a jaw-dropping mission the couple were kidnapped, held hostage and then 'employed' to make films for the Dear Leader, including a remake of Godzilla. They gained Kim's trust - but could they escape?

"The 1978 abductions of the South Korean actress Choi-Eun-He and her ex-husband, the director Shin Sang-Ok, in Hong Kong is the true crime at the center of Paul Fischer's gripping and surprisingly timely new book."

The New York Times

See more
See less
See more
See less
What to know in advance of your conversation
Audio-only
All calls on Skolay are audio-only.
Where and how calls happen
All calls are hosted directly on the Skolay app. A window to join the call will open five minutes before, and the call will connect at the scheduled start time.
Cancellations
Skolay offers free cancellations when done more than 24 hours in advance of a call. However, calls cancelled within 24 hours of the scheduled start time will incur a fee of 25% of the total price out of respect for the writer’s time.
Late to a call
You have five minutes to join the call after the scheduled start time. After that point the call window will close and you will be charged the full price of the conversation.